Feb 27, 2021  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Academic Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Education

  
  •  

    EDU 391 - Clinical: Science


    1 credits
    A practical experience in the elementary, middle, or secondary schools in which students observe teachers, assist with small group instruction, and teach a micro lesson in science. Must be taken concurrently with EDU 327  or with consent of the director.
    Term Offered: Spring semester
  
  •  

    EDU 392 - Clinical: Mathematics


    1 credits
    A practical experience in middle childhood through early adolescent mathematics in which the students observe teachers, assist with small group instruction, teach two complete lessons, and collect date for an action research project. Must be taken concurrently with EDU 328  or with consent of the Director.
    Term Offered: Fall semester
  
  •  

    EDU 393 - Clinical: (Major) Secondary


    1 credits
    A practical experience in a secondary school in which students observe teachers, assist with small group instruction, and teach micro lessons in their major. Must be taken concurrently with EDU 342  or with consent of the director.
    Term Offered: Fall semester
  
  •  

    EDU 394 - Clinical: Middle


    1 credits
    A practical experience in a middle school in which students observe teachers, assist with small group instruction, and teach micro lessons in their major or minor. Must be taken concurrently with EDU 323 .
    Term Offered: Spring semester
  
  •  

    EDU 395 - PST Clinical: (Minor) Middle/Secondary


    1 credits
    A practical experience in a middle or secondary school in which students observe teachers, assist with small group instruction, and teach micro lessons in their minor. Must be taken concurrently with EDU 341  or with consent of the director.
    Term Offered: See department chair
  
  •  

    EDU 396 - Clinical: Literacy: Middle Childhood


    1 credits
    A practical experience in a literacy tutoring program in the elementary classroom emphasizing developmental reading: observation of teachers, assistance with deficient and gifted readers, and instruction of skill and literature-based lessons. Must be taken concurrently with EDU 333  or with consent of the director.
    Term Offered: Fall semester
  
  •  

    EDU 397 - Clinical: Literacy: Early Adolescence/Adolescence


    1 credits
    A practical experience in a literacy tutoring program and in the middle/secondary classroom emphasizing content area reading: observation of teachers, assistance with deficient and gifted readers, and instruction of lessons which emphasize reading skills. Must be taken concurrently with EDU 431  or with consent of the director of teacher education.
    Term Offered: Spring semester
  
  •  

    EDU 402 - History and Philosophy of Education


    3 credits
    A study of the precedents, problems, trends, and ideas which have shaped education throughout history into what we know and understand it to be today. Analysis of educational thought, philosophical tends, and current perspectives on the means, methods, and systems of education from early history to the present in Western civilization.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing
    Term Offered: Fall semester
  
  •  

    EDU 403 - Assessment and Evaluation for Academic Success


    3 credits
    Examination of learning as informed through various forms of assessment; informal to formal, authentic to standardized-study of appropriate application for correction, grading, evaluation and assessment; emphasis on improvement of instruction. Assessment of exceptional learners, practical and ethical considerations, alternative assessments, including educational, behavioral, and psychological procedures.
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the School of Education, senior status, or consent of the Director of Teacher Education.
    Term Offered: Rotational basis
  
  •  

    EDU 405 - Special Education Law and Legal/Ethical Consideration


    3 credits
    In-depth analysis of special education legislation, implementation trends on the state and local levels, and legal implications for faculty and staff; examination, development, and assessment of individualized plans; focus on effective meeting protocols, communication, and conflict resolution.
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Special Education Major or consent of the Director of Teacher Education
    Term Offered: Rotational basis
  
  •  

    EDU 431 - Content Area Literacy


    3 credits
    Instruction in the teaching of reading and writing within the content areas on the elementary/middle/secondary level. Consideration of the nature of the learner, the readability and scope of content area materials, theories and methods of language arts curriculum, instructional techniques relating to continued literacy, development within the content areas, remediation and enrichment activities. Emphasis on the interactive processes of reading, writing, and learning. Field work included: early adolescence/adolescence majors concurrently enroll in EDU 396 .
    Term Offered: Spring semester
  
  •  

    EDU 480 - Special Topics:


    Variable credits
    Term Offered: See department chair
  
  •  

    EDU 481 - Early Childhood Practicum


    2 credits
    Practical experience in an early childhood setting. Students spend a minimum of 30 hours, assisting in a range of instructional activities, focusing on areas of literacy, classroom management and discipline.
    Term Offered: See department chair
  
  •  

    EDU 482 - Kindergarten Practicum


    3 credits
    Practical experience in a kindergarten setting. Students spend a minimum of 45 hours, assisting in a range of instructional activities, focusing on areas of literacy, classroom management and discipline.
    Term Offered: See department chair
  
  •  

    EDU 483 - General Practicum


    2 credits
    Practical experience in a general educational setting. Students spend a minimum of 15 hours per credit, assisting in a range of instructional activities, focusing on areas of literacy, classroom management and discipline.
    Term Offered: See department chair
  
  •  

    EDU 484 - Practicum in Adaptive Education


    2 credits
    Term Offered: See department chair
  
  •  

    EDU 485 - Practicum in Special EDU Classroom


    2 credits
    A practical experience in which students observe special education teachers, assist with small group instruction, and teach micro lessons in the major, focusing on their concentration in learning disabilities. Must be taken concurrently with EDU 352  or with consent of the Director of Teacher Education.
    Term Offered: See department chair
  
  •  

    EDU 490 - Education Internship


    Variable credits
    Term Offered: See department chair
  
  •  

    EDU 492 - Clinical: Multiculturalism


    1 credits
    Field experience in PK-12 schools which addresses awareness of diversity and multiculturalism. This clinical is taken only when these hours have not been met through other clinical experiences as described in Appendix C of the Teacher Education Handbook.
    Term Offered: See department chair
  
  •  

    EDU 493 - Portfolio Seminar


    1 credits
    An integrative academic experience required of all EDU majors in their final academic semester prior to student teaching. This course is considered a capstone course where students demonstrate through an electronic portofio and formal presentation that they have the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary for the formal student teaching or internship experience.
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the teacher education program and completion or concurrent enrollment in the final course of the program.
    Term Offered: Every semester
  
  •  

    EDU 494 - Teacher Candidate Internship


    10 credits
    A supervised internship in which students engage in planned instruction and other duties as a designated part of a teaching experience on the early childhood, elementary, middle or high school levels. Placement is limited to schools in the Metro Milwaukee area. Students must have transportation. Student teaching with the seminar is considered a full load; no other classes should be added. Because of state requirements, students follow the calendar of the school district, not the college.
    Prerequisite(s): All other education courses, completion of clinical experiences, portfolio presentation, and formal department approval.
    Term Offered: See department chair
  
  •  

    EDU 495 - Teacher Candidacy


    5 credits
    A supervised practicum in which students engage in planned instruction and other duties as a designated part of a teaching experience in early childhood/middle childhood, middle childhood/early adolescent, early adolescent/adolescent, or middle childhood/adolescent levels. Placement is limited to public schools in the Metro-Milwaukee areas. Students must have transportation. Student teaching with the seminar is considered a full load; no other classes should be added. Because of state requirements, students follow the calendar of the school district, not the college.
    Prerequisite(s): All other education courses, completion of clinical experiences, portfolio presentation, and formal department approval.
    Term Offered: Every semester
  
  •  

    EDU 496 - Seminar for Teacher Candidates


    2 credits
    A seminar held weekly during the student teaching experience with members of the education faculty and other students who are student teaching to discuss and explore challenges, experiences, and difficulties encountered in the student teaching experience. Must be taken concurrently with EDU 494 /EDU 495 .
    Term Offered: Every semester
  
  •  

    EDU 497 - Professional Development


    2 credits
    Term Offered: See department chair

English

  
  •  

    ENG x91 - Special Topics


    Variable credits
    Term Offered: Even spring semesters
  
  •  

    ENG x99 - Independent Study


    Variable credits
    By arrangement with department.
    Term Offered: Every semester
  
  •  

    ENG 100 - Transition to College Writing


    3 credits
    A reinforcing of students’ basic writing skills, which includes a review of writing conventions, sentence and paragraph development, and supporting a thesis. May not be taken concurrently with ENG 101 . Does not count toward General Education requirements.
    Prerequisite(s): Placement
    Term Offered: Fall semester
  
  •  

    ENG 101 - Writing and Rhetoric


    3 credits
    Workshop with emphasis on writing as a process. Students work on essay structure, idea organization and development, and grammatical correctness. Research and documentation skills also introduced. A minimum grade of C is required to fulfill General Education requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): Placement
    Term Offered: Every semester
  
  •  

    ENG 210 - American Literature 1


    3 credits
    A survey of major American writers and literary movements from the Puritan era through the Transcendentalists.
    Term Offered: Fall semester
  
  •  

    ENG 211 - American Literature 2


    3 credits
    Second part of American literature survey examining major writers and literary movements from Whitman to the present.
    Term Offered: Spring semester
  
  •  

    ENG 220 - British Literature 1


    3 credits
    A survey of major British authors and literary movements from Beowulf through the late eighteenth century.
    Term Offered: Fall semester
  
  •  

    ENG 221 - British Literature 2


    3 credits
    Second part of British literature survey examining major writers and literary movements from the Romantics to the present.
    Term Offered: Spring semester
  
  •  

    ENG 293 - Genre Studies: Drama


    3 credits
    Students study the social and cultural aspects of dramatic literature from the classical era to the present. Includes Greek, Medieval, Elizabethan, French Renaissance, Romantic, and Modern selections.
    Term Offered: Fall semester
  
  •  

    ENG 294 - Genre Studies: Poetry


    3 credits
    Students study a variety of poetic forms and styles from medieval to modern. Course includes close examinations of prosody; students may compose several poems.
    Term Offered: Every semester
  
  •  

    ENG 295 - Genre Studies: Fiction


    3 credits
    Students read representative prose fiction, including both short stories and novels, of American, English, continental, or minority writers. The student’s awareness of the distinction of this genre is increased through a study of various fictional modes, forms, conventions, and styles.
    Term Offered: Spring semester
  
  •  

    ENG 299 - Independent Study


    3 credits
    Term Offered: Every semester
  
  •  

    ENG 303 - Professional Writing


    3 credits
    This workshop course will mix business and technical writing instruction. Students will learn to write business communications, product descriptions, process analyses, and reports.
    Term Offered: Odd fall semesters
  
  •  

    ENG 304 - Advanced Writing


    3 credits
    A workshop in composition designed to help upper-level students develop an accurate and effective prose style. Short essays regularly read and written.
    Term Offered: Even spring semesters
  
  •  

    ENG 305 - Creative Writing


    3 credits
    This workshop course allows students to craft original works of short fiction, poetry, and other literary genres. Composing and critiquing of student work required.
    Term Offered: Even fall semesters
  
  •  

    ENG 306 - Technical and Scientific Writing


    3 credits
    Introduction to the theoretical foundation of technical and scientific writing, as well the research, writing, technological skills necessary for the preparation of technical and scientific documents and presentations.
    Term Offered: Odd spring semesters
  
  •  

    ENG 307 - Non-Western Perspectives


    3 credits
    Students read selections that highlight contemporary nonwestern ethnic and minority perspectives. The readings in fiction, poetry, and drama expose students to a rich and diverse array of customs and cultures.
    Term Offered: Spring semester
  
  •  

    ENG 310 - Early American Literature


    3 credits
    Writings of exploration and colonization tracing literature from pre-Revolutionary times to the pre-Civil war period. Writers include Bradford, Edwards, Franklin, Taylor, Cooper, and Poe.
    Term Offered: Odd fall semesters
  
  •  

    ENG 311 - American Renaissance


    3 credits
    A study of the major figures responsible for the flowering of American literature in New England in the middle 1800s. Authors include Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, and Dickinson.
    Term Offered: Even spring semesters
  
  •  

    ENG 312 - American Realism and Naturalism


    3 credits
    A study of major American authors of the late 1800s through the early 1900s. Authors include Twain, Howells, James, Harte, Chopin, Wharton, Crane, Dreiser, Sinclair, London, Norris and others.
    Term Offered: Even fall semesters
  
  •  

    ENG 313 - 20th Century American Literature


    3 credits
    A study of form, theme and context in American literature from World War I to the present with primary emphasis given to the novel. Authors may include Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Steinbeck, McCullers, Updike, Oates, Hurston, and Pynchon. Poets may include Frost, Robinson, Stevens, Cummings, and Plath.
    Term Offered: Odd spring semesters
  
  •  

    ENG 320 - Medieval and Renaissance Literature


    3 credits
    A study of medieval lyrics, narratives, and romances with emphasis on the works of Chaucer. In addition, reading of significant works by early Renaissance authors.
    Term Offered: Odd fall semesters
  
  •  

    ENG 321 - Shakespeare 1


    3 credits
    A study of several representative plays, including histories, comedies, and tragedies. Students will analyze Shakespeare’s use of language in individual plys and test several interpretive strategies.
    Term Offered: Even spring semesters
  
  •  

    ENG 322 - Shakespeare 2


    3 credits
    An examination of a particular critical theme or issue both within the context of both Shakespeare’s plays, as well as the broader context of early modern British culture.
    Term Offered: Even fall semesters
  
  •  

    ENG 323 - Major British Authors, 17th Century


    3 credits
    A study of several of the major literary figures in seventeenth-century England in their cultural and historical contexts. Authors may include Donne, Herbert, Milton, Dryden, Bacon, and Addison.
    Term Offered: Odd spring semesters
  
  •  

    ENG 324 - Restoration and 18th Century Literature


    3 credits
    This course addresses British literature of the “long eighteenth century,” that is, from the Restoration of the Monarchy up to the pre-Romantic eighteenth century. Authors may include Pope, Boswell, Fielding, Gray, Goldsmith, Johnson, Sterne, Smollett, and Swift.
    Term Offered: Odd fall semesters
  
  •  

    ENG 325 - British Romanticism


    3 credits
    A study of the British romantic movement from 1783-1832. Authors include Austen, Scott, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelly, and Byron.
    Term Offered: Odd spring semesters
  
  •  

    ENG 326 - Victorian Literature


    3 credits
    A study of the major Victorian novelists, essayists, and poets read in light of the social and cultural shifts of the Victorian period. Authors may include Dickens, the Brontës, Hardy, Trollope, Eliot, Thackeray, Gaskell, Kipling, Wilde, Arnold, Carlyle, Mill, Pater, Ruskin, Tennyson, the Brownings, the Rossettis, and Hopkins.
    Term Offered: Even fall semesters
  
  •  

    ENG 328 - 20th Century British Literature


    3 credits
    A study of major British poets, novelists, and essayists against the background of the major social and cultural changes of the twentieth century. Includes Conrad, Woolf, Joyce, Eliot, Orwell, Lawrence, Yeats, Lessing, and others.
    Term Offered: Even spring semesters
  
  •  

    ENG 330 - Introduction to Language and Linguistics


    3 credits
    The historical development, grammar, linguistic characteristics, and semantic principles of the English language; language acquisition; and psycholinguistics.
    Term Offered: Spring semester
  
  •  

    ENG 335 - Literary Criticism


    3 credits
    A study of literary theory from the ancient world to contemporary approaches.
    Term Offered: Even fall semesters
  
  •  

    ENG 400 - Contemporary Trends in Literature


    3 credits
    An analysis of artistic directions in current times. Course includes readings of contemporary criticism and theories, discussions, presentations, written responses, and various gallery experiences.
  
  •  

    ENG 490 - English Internship


    Variable credits
    By arrangement with department.
    Term Offered: Every semester
  
  •  

    ENG 498 - Senior Thesis


    3 credits
    Senior thesis development and composition. Supervised research or creative project designed as capstone for English majors. Public presentation of work at end of the term.
    Term Offered: Fall semester

Geography

  
  •  

    GEO x91 - Special Topics


    Variable credits
    Term Offered: See department chair
  
  •  

    GEO x99 - Independent Study


    Variable credits
    Term Offered: See department chair
  
  •  

    GEO 125 - Physical Geography


    3 credits
    A study of the physical elements in geography and their relation to people. Emphasis is on the structure of the earth, its climate, weather, soils, natural vegetation, land forms, and on processes of erosion and deposition.
    Term Offered: Every semester

German

German is a good foundation for a number of professional careers. The study of German, its history, and culture give the student an edge in such diverse fields as international law, mathematics, philosophy, psychology, technology, chemistry, physics, biology, engineering, music, and the arts. Business majors who also major or minor in German have a leading edge in today’s global market. In addition, having a reading knowledge of German satisfies the language requirements of many graduate school programs.

All classes are conducted in German.

  
  •  

    GER x91 - Special Topics


    Variable credits
    Term Offered: See department chair
  
  •  

    GER x99 - Independent Study


    Variable credits
    By arrangement with the department.
    Term Offered: See department chair
  
  •  

    GER 100 - Navigating Cultural Pitfalls


    3 credits
    No one wants to end up the joke of YouTube for a simple cultural mistake. This course is here to give students the knowledge to become successful at handling the challenges they will encounter in another culture. Students will compare the American culture to German culture by studying areas like language, business, and important traditions. The final result is a student who can navigate the cultural pitfalls without breaking a sweat.
    Term Offered: Spring semester
  
  •  

    GER 101 - Elementary German 1


    4 credits
    A communicative introductory course to German stressing the language skills of speaking, reading, writing, and listening. The course also introduces students to the cultures of the German-speaking countries. Once a week students will be scheduled with a language assistant in the language lab.
    Term Offered: Fall semester
  
  •  

    GER 102 - Elementary German 2


    4 credits
    Continuation of Elementary German 1.
    Prerequisite(s): GER 101  (grade of C or better), or by placement.
    Term Offered: Spring semester
  
  •  

    GER 201 - Intermediate German 1


    3 credits
    Oral and written communication skills will continue to be developed and expanded. Readings emphasizing cultural topics will be introduced and discussed.
    Prerequisite(s): GER 102  (grade of C or better), or by placement.
    Term Offered: Fall semester
  
  •  

    GER 202 - Intermediate German 2


    3 credits
    Continuation of Intermediate German 1.
    Prerequisite(s): GER 201  (grade of C or better), or by placement.
    Term Offered: Spring semester

Greek

NOTE: A classical Greek alternative using Xenophon’s Anabasis may be elected.

  
  •  

    GRE x91 - Special Topics


    Variable credits
  
  •  

    GRE x99 - Independent Study


    Variable credits
  
  •  

    GRE 101 - Elementary Greek 1


    3 credits
    Vocabulary, grammatical forms, and syntax preparatory to initial readings in the Greek New Testament are studied.
  
  •  

    GRE 102 - Elementary Greek 2


    3 credits
    Continued study of basic Greek syntax together with readings from the general Epistles of John and selections from the Gospel of Mark.
    Prerequisite(s): GRE 101 
  
  •  

    GRE 201 - Intermediate Greek 1


    3 credits
    The reading of a major portion of the Gospel of John in its original language together with the grammatical and syntactical study of its literature.
    Prerequisite(s): GRE 102 
  
  •  

    GRE 202 - Intermediate Greek 2


    3 credits
    The reading and exegesis of selected portions of the book of Acts, 1 Corinthians, and Ephesians.
    Prerequisite(s): GRE 201 

History

  
  •  

    HIS x99 - Independent Study


    Variable credits
    By arrangement with department
    Term Offered: Every semester
  
  •  

    HIS 4xx - History Thesis


    3 credits
    Students will write a substantial thesis based on independent research, which will be done in a 400 level course that most closely corresponds to the thesis topic. Any of the 300 level American, European, Global or Thematic courses can be taken as a 400 level course with the additional thesis requirement with junior or senior standing.
    Term Offered: Every semester
  
  •  

    HIS 101 - American History 1, 1492-1865


    3 credits
    A survey of American history from the colonial era to the end of the Civil War. The social, political, cultural, and economic developments of our country are studied.
    Term Offered: Every semester
  
  •  

    HIS 102 - American History 2, 1866-1945


    3 credits
    A survey of American history from Reconstruction to the end of World War II. The social, political, cultural, and economic developments of our country are studied.
    Term Offered: Every semester
  
  •  

    HIS 103 - Modern America, 1945-present


    3 credits
    A course designed to study the most recent period in American history, from the end of World War II to the present. The key events, individuals, and themes of this era will be studied.
    Term Offered: Spring semester
  
  •  

    HIS 111 - European History 1, to - 1500


    3 credits
    An introductory study of the origins of European civilization from the beginnings of recorded history through the Renaissance. The course surveys the origins of western civilization in the ancient Near East and then turns to the classical civilizations of Greece and Rome, concluding with an exploration of the medieval period and the Renaissance. Designed for freshmen and sophomores.
    Term Offered: Fall semester
  
  •  

    HIS 112 - European History 2, 1500-1850


    3 credits
    An introductory study of the early modern period in European history, continuing the story of the development of European history from the period of the Reformation through the mid-nineteenth century. The course surveys the impact of the Reformation, European exploration and discovery of the “New World”, absolutism, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution and Napoleon, and the period of romanticism and reaction in the early nineteenth century. Designed for freshmen and sophomores.
    Term Offered: Spring semester
  
  •  

    HIS 113 - Modern Europe, 1850-present


    3 credits
    A study of the late-nineteenth century, First World War, the worldwide depression, the rise of the dictators, the Second World War, the Cold War, and European society, economics, and politics toward the end of the twentieth century. Designed for freshmen and sophomores.
    Term Offered: Fall semester
  
  •  

    HIS 319 - Greece and Rome


    3 credits
    This course covers the histories of Classical Greece and Rome from ca. 800 BC- 500 AD. The Greeks and the Romans regularly interacted and their histories overlap in many ways. Greek culture reached its peak earlier than Roman, but neither was independent of the other. In this class we will explore the written and material records to develop a fuller understanding of Classical Mediterranean history and discover the many ways in which Greek and Roman history shapes the modern world. May be taken as a 400 level thesis course with instructor approval. Course may not be repeated if already taken at the 300 level.
    Term Offered: Fall semester
  
  •  

    HIS 320 - Medieval History, 500-1450


    3 credits
    A study of the history of Late Antique and Medieval European history from the re-making of the Roman empire under Diocletian and later Constantine to the High Renaissance. In this course we will study the relationship between the Christian church, society, and nation-states and their collective influence on modern Western history. We also will explore the ways in which medieval Europeans interacted with other civilizations, especially Byzantium and the Islamic States. We will engage directly with the primary sources and scholarship to more fully understand the period and the people who lived during it. May be taken as a 400 level thesis course with instructor approval. Course may not be repeated if already taken at the 300 level.A study of medieval and early modern history from the fall of Rome, the rise of the church and states, medieval society and education, and the continuing influence of this period on modern times.
    Term Offered: Spring semester
  
  •  

    HIS 321 - The Crusades


    3 credits
    The Crusades mark the first major clash between Christianity and Islam. These two religions and cultures began over three hundred years of warfare-Islam on the offensive and Christianity on the defensive. The idea of crusades for the faith became an important aspect of the medieval age in Europe. This course will not only study the crusades in the Holy Land and Spain against Islam, but also the Northern Crusades against paganism and other crusades mounted against heresy in the Christian faith. May be taken as a 400 level thesis course with instructor approval. Course may not be repeated if already taken at the 300 level.
    Term Offered: Odd spring semesters
  
  •  

    HIS 322 - The French Revolution and Napoleon, 1789-1815


    3 credits
    The French Revolution represents one of the greatest transformative periods in modern history. This course studies the origins of the revolution in European thought, society, and politics, and then traces its moderate beginnings, its turn toward radicalism in the Reign of Terror, and its international impacts. We then turn to a detailed study of Napoleon Bonaparte as a military dictator, consolidator of the revolution, and conqueror. Finally, the course concludes with Napoleon’s defeat and the effort to put the pieces of Europe back together after over twenty years of revolution, upheaval, and war. May be taken as a 400 level thesis course with instructor approval. Course may not be repeated if already taken at the 300 level.
    Term Offered: Odd fall semesters
  
  •  

    HIS 324 - World War I, 1900 - 1925


    3 credits
    This course will cover the first quarter of the Twentieth Century in Europe. Focus will be on Europe prior to the war, the causes of conflict, the war itself and its impact on the future of Europe and the world. May be taken as a 400 level thesis course with instructor approval. Course may not be repeated if already taken at the 300 level.
    Term Offered: Odd fall semesters
  
  •  

    HIS 325 - World War II


    3 credits
    A program of study on the era of the Second World War. Emphasis will be on the political, economic, religious, social, and military trends that started, furthered, and ended the war. It will also show how the war altered the course of the world history and set the Soviet Union and the United States on a collision course that ended in the Cold War. May be taken as a 400 level thesis course with instructor approval. Course may not be repeated if already taken at the 300 level.
    Term Offered: Even fall semesters
  
  •  

    HIS 342 - Colonial Latin America


    3 credits
    This course studies the development of Latin America from European discovery through the independence movements of the early nineteenth century, with special attention paid to Mexico, the Andes, the Caribbean and Brazil. May be taken as a 400 level thesis course with instructor approval. Course may not be repeated if already taken at the 300 level.
    Term Offered: Odd spring semesters
  
  •  

    HIS 352 - Islam and the Middle East


    3 credits
    A study of the origins, teachings and spread of Islam. In this course we will trace the development of the Islamic concepts of political and religious power from the 7th c. AD through the early 2000s. We will also explore the social, cultural, and intellectual history of the region (modern Middle East) to better understand how the Middle East came to be what it is today and how the relationship between those states and others are shaped by their interactions with one another. We will approach our study through primary sources, scholarship, and material culture. May be taken as a 400 level thesis course with instructor approval. Course may not be repeated if already taken at the 300 level.
    Term Offered: Even spring semesters
  
  •  

    HIS 357 - Women in History


    3 credits
    A comparative survey of the contributions of women in world history. The course will include elite and non-elite women in Western European, Eastern, Middle Eastern, and American traditions from the ancient to the modern era. Students will access these histories through textual and material sources, exploring broader concepts such as the historical importance of women in political, social, and religious contexts. May be taken as a 400 level thesis course with instructor approval. Course may not be repeated if already taken at the 300 level.
    Term Offered: Odd fall semesters
  
  •  

    HIS 363 - Chinese History


    3 credits
    In this course we will focus on the long history of China from the early imperial period to the end of the twentieth century. We will explore China through political and social history with the aim of understanding how Chinese and Western cultures developed fundamentally different cultural perspectives. These differences will be more fully articulated in the history of their acquaintance with one another and the consequences of those interactions for modern people. We will approach the history through a variety of means, including primary sources, modern scholarship, and material culture. May be taken as a 400 level thesis course with instructor approval. Course may not be repeated if already taken at the 300 level.
    Term Offered: Even fall semesters
  
  •  

    HIS 371 - Native American History


    3 credits
    A study of Native American cultures and histories and the impact of European/American civilizations upon them. Course covers pre-Columbian history to the present day. May be taken as a 400 level thesis course with instructor approval. Course may not be repeated if already taken at the 300 level.
    Term Offered: Even fall semesters
  
  •  

    HIS 379 - Witchcraft and Culture in the Atlantic World


    3 credits
    In the years from roughly 1500-1800, thousands of women and men in Europe and the Americas were put on trial and executed for the crime of witchcraft. The people of this period sincerely believed in the physical presence of the Devil, whose rampant minions lurked behind the masks of friends, neighbors, and family members. This course examines the history of popular culture, witchcraft beliefs, and occult practices in the early modern Atlantic World. Lectures will provide students with necessary background information for each section. The first section covers the popular culture of Western Europe, followed by a detailed examination of witchcraft and occult beliefs, criminal justice, and the great European witch hunts. Next, the course moves out into the Atlantic, exploring how European culture, religion, witchcraft, and occult beliefs converged with those of Indian and African peoples in the Americas. Finally, the course moves to British America, where the infamous Salem Witchcraft Trials provide a detailed case study using the original court records. May be taken as a 400 level thesis course with instructor approval. Course may not be repeated if already taken at the 300 level.
    Term Offered: Rotational basis
  
  •  

    HIS 380 - Colonial British America, 1480-1763


    3 credits
    This course explores the rise and development of Britain’s American empire, including the thirteen North American colonies, Canada, and the West Indies. We begin with early efforts at exploration and colonization, including Massachusetts Bay and Jamestown in Virginia and conclude with Britain’s triumph in the “Great War for Empire” or French and Indian War in 1769, setting the stage for the years of imperial crisis, revolution, and independence that followed. May be taken as a 400 level thesis course with instructor approval. Course may not be repeated if already taken at the 300 level.
    Term Offered: Even spring semesters
  
  •  

    HIS 381 - American Revolution and Early Republic, 1763-1815


    3 credits
    John Adams once wrote, “Posterity! You will never know how much it cost the present Generation to preserve your Freedom!” Americans indeed witnessed great struggles and challenges in this era and fought, often with each other, to define liberty, patriotism, equality, the rule of law, and ultimately what it meant to be a nation. This course will cover the crucial founding period of United States history, including detailed explorations and discussions of the fracturing of the British Empire, the long war for independence, the framing and ratifying of the constitution, the expansion of slavery, and the new republic tested by the dangers of a world at war in the early nineteenth century. The contributions of major figures including Adams, Jefferson, Washington, Hamilton, and Madison will also be discussed in depth. May be taken as a 400 level thesis course with instructor approval. Course may not be repeated if already taken at the 300 level.
    Term Offered: Even fall semesters
  
  •  

    HIS 383 - American Civil War, 1848-1877


    3 credits
    This course surveys the causes for the Civil War, the military, political, social, and economic events of the Civil War and Reconstruction. May be taken as a 400 level thesis course with instructor approval. Course may not be repeated if already taken at the 300 level.
    Term Offered: Odd fall semesters
  
  •  

    HIS 384 - The American West


    3 credits
    The “Wild West” has played an important role in the development of the American psyche and culture. It has become a symbol of the United States across the world. The West sees the intermixing of several diverse cultures–Native American, African American, Asian American, Hispanic and Anglo. This course deals with key individuals, groups and events that have become legendary to Americans, from gunfighters to the Little Big Horn, from Billy the Kid, Jesse James and Geronimo. This course will study the west as it was and how it is viewed in our cultural memory. May be taken as a 400 level thesis course with instructor approval. Course may not be repeated if already taken at the 300 level.
    Term Offered: Even fall semesters
  
  •  

    HIS 391 - Special Topics in History


    3 credits
    Courses may include regional or thematic offerings spanning any period or geographic area. Possible topics might include the history of particular nations such as England or Germany or themes such as slavery or disease in history.
    Term Offered: Rotational basis
  
  •  

    HIS 490 - History Internship


    Variable credits
    By arrangement with department and internship coordinator.
    Term Offered: Every semester
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9